HOW SHAKESPEARE CHANGED EVERYTHING
HOW SHAKESPEARE CHANGED EVERYTHING

Nearly four hundred years after his death, Shakespeare permeates our everyday lives: from the words that we speak, to the teenage heartthrobs we worship, to the political rhetoric spewed by the 24-hour news cycle. In the pages of this wickedly fun little book, Esquire columnist Stephen Marche uncovers the hidden influence of Shakespeare in our culture.

William Shakespeare was the most influential person who ever lived. He shaped our world more than any political or religious leader, more than any explorer or engineer. The gifted playwright who moves audiences to laughter and tears has also moved history. Do any other poets even begin to change our behavior or our environment? W.H. Auden once wrote that 'poetry makes nothing happen. It exists in the valley of its saying where executives would never want to tamper.' Shakespeare has wandered away from the valley of his saying and hangs around in the most unlikely places, in 1950's teen rebel movies and in psychoanalysts' offices, in nightclubs and in mall food courts, in voting booths in the American South and in the trash of Central Park. The effects of his words on the world have been out of all proportion, monstrous and sublime, vertiginous in their consequences, far beyond anything he could have predicted.

How Shakespeare Changed Everything finds
Shakespeare's various effects on world history, which would have boggled his own capacious imaginati

http://
This is a wonderful book about seeing the world through Shakespeare-tinted glasses. You'll never look at the food court, Justin Beiber--or, for that matter, the English language--the same way again.
— A.J. Jacobs
Informed, ebullient and profoundly respectful.
— Kirkus Reviews
[How Shakespeare Changed Everything] is informative and entertaining.
— Publishers Weekly
-
aSHINING AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA
aSHINING AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

In this stylistic tour de force, Stephen Marche creates the entire culture of a place called Sanjania-its national symbols, political movements, folk heroes, a group of writers dubbed fictioneers, a national airline called Sanjair, and a rich literary history. Sanjania is an island nation whose English-speaking citizens draw upon the English, American, Australian, and Canadian literary traditions. This brilliant story is an anthology, taking the reader from the rough and tumble pamphlets of 1870s Sanjania to the burgeoning Sanjanian nationalistic awareness in the 1930s literary journal, The Real Story, to the extraordinary longing of the writings of the Sanjanian Diaspora. These works develop into a Rashomon-like story, introducing us to illustrious Sanjanian figures such as the repentant prostitute Pigeon Blackhat and the magically talented couple Caesar and Endurance. The result is a vibrant evocation of a country-from the birth pangs of its first settlers and their hardy vernacular to its revolutionary years and all the way to the present-all told in Stephen Marche's innovative and accomplished writing.

http://www.sanjania.com/
May be the most exciting mash-up of literary genres since David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas.
— NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW
A real tour de force, ingenious and hilarious, a tour of the island of one writer's fertile mind.
— SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
Impossible to categorize, impressive in execution, always enthralling, Shining at the Bottom of the Sea is a joy, and a celebration of all that is possible in literature.
— WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
-
aRAYMOND + HANNAH
aRAYMOND + HANNAH

This boldly contemporary love story combines sex and seriousness, physical lust and spiritual longing. Raymond and Hannah hook up at a party; a one-night stand expands into a weeklong passionate and surprisingly deep love affair. Then Hannah leaves for a year in Jerusalem. With six thousand miles separating their bodies, the energy of love and lust must be sublimated to the written word. While Hannah immerses herself in Torah and the Orthodox world of Jerusalem, Raymond remains in multicultural Toronto, working on his dissertation on Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy.

Over the school year, Hannah's growing love for her Jewishness is more and more at odds with her love for a blond, blue-eyed WASP. And Raymond, pining in Toronto, seems to be living out his dissertation before he's even written it. Can this new love affair survive distance, cultural dissonance, and out-of-sync, late-night e-mails?

In this remarkable debut, carnal love confronts religion and culture, and modern passion finds its counterpoint in ancient texts.

http://
As if Abelard and Eloise had finally stumbled into the Internet Age.
— LOS ANGELES TIMES
A wry and sexy international love story.
— NEW YORK MAGAZINE
So dazzling, so unsentimental... A work that is both beautiful and confusing. In other words, an honest love story.
— New York Times Book Review
In his startling debut, Marche offers up a rare hybrid: the page-turner prose poem... In this lushly Romantic book, love between Jew and atheist gentile resembles the divided city, simultaneously impossible and actual.
— Publishers Weekly
-
aLUCY HARDIN'S MISSING PERIOD
aLUCY HARDIN'S MISSING PERIOD

Lucy Hardin's Missing Period is an interactive novel with hundreds of possible storylines and multiple outcomes. It uses a web format to capture the reality of a young woman in Toronto in the early 2000s, allowing the reader to explore different aspects of Lucy's life and times and the city in which she lives, while following her through the labyrinth of her various futures. Lucy's fate, like our own, is up in the air, open to negotiation and sudden change.

http://www.walrusmagazine.ca/lucyhardin/
This country's master creator of parallel universes.
— The National Post